Gravity's Rainbow

botany, shoes, books, and justice

August 31, 2019
by sarcozona
0 comments

Women may not always be very visible in far right movements, but they are absolutely part of it. The far right (in some places) is starting to make some concessions to women’s rights while emphasizing xenophobia, which attracts many (white) women who are playing more prominent roles in far right movements.

Scholars, policymakers and the media have made great strides in understanding the role of masculinity in attracting men to far-right groups. But we have paid less attention to the potential for (re)framing femininity, women’s role in the nation, or discussions of women’s right to be used for recruitment or radicalisation by far-right political parties and movements. There is also scant discussion of the potential for women’s anger, their greater vulnerability during economic crises, or how the disproportionate impact of public service cutbacks on women is influencing their support for far-right politics.

via Women are joining the far right – we need to understand why | Cynthia Miller-Idriss and Hilary Pilkington | Opinion | The Guardian

I’m always fascinated by the role right wing women play in constructing and reproducing the imagery of white supremacy and fascism – the obsession with nostalgia and an imagined recent and ancient past, gender roles, whiteness. For example.

April 6, 2019
by sarcozona
0 comments

“A socialist is just someone who is unable to get over his or her astonishment that most people who have lived and died have spent lives of wretched, fruitless, unremitting toil.” That really is the core of it. A socialist is, first and foremost, not just perturbed by injustice, but horrified by it, really truly sickened by it in a way that means they can’t stop thinking about it. It gives you the feeling that “we can’t do anything about that” or “that’s just the way of the world” is not acceptable.

via A Speech on Socialism at Andover | Current Affairs

March 24, 2019
by sarcozona
0 comments

This study estimated that socioeconomically vulnerable Canadians’ chances of receiving better health care were 36% greater than their American counterparts and this estimate was larger than that based on general patient comparisons (9%). One may wonder about the public health significance of such relative risks/protections. Attributions of risk/protection among populations are a function of three factors of which relative risk is only one. The size of the population and the prevalence of exposure to risks are also important. In this instance, the entire USA population is at relatively greater risk of receiving lower quality care, its more prevalent low-income and inadequately insured populations more so. Applying our findings to population parameters and attributable risk formulations we estimated that without reform, over the next generation more than 50 million Americans will be treated less optimally and die earlier than had they enjoyed a single-payer health care system like Canada’s.

 

via Care of acute conditions and chronic diseases in Canada and the United States: Rapid systematic review and meta-analysis | Journal of Public Health Research