Gravity's Rainbow

botany, shoes, books, and justice

November 24, 2015
by sarcozona
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Critiques of recent scandals in Silicon Valley rightly place the blame on a culture that supports amorality, thoughtlessness, and ignorance rather than ill intent.[2] But the problem runs much deeper, because Silicon Valley’s amorality problem arises from the implicit and explicit narrative of progress companies use for marketing and that people use to find meaning in their work. By accepting this narrative of progress uncritically, imagining that technological change equals historic human betterment, many in Silicon Valley excuse themselves from moral reflection. Put simply, the progress narrative short-circuits moral reflection on the consequences of new technologies.

Source: Morality and the Idea of Progress in Silicon Valley | Berkeley Journal of Sociology

October 28, 2015
by sarcozona
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We like to think of ourselves as separate from our illness. We like to blame an outside source, whether it’s evil spirits or microbes, anything foreign, anything outside ourselves. We love to pinpoint the cause, to point to that tumor, that gene, that trauma, and say, Aha! There’s your problem! It’s comforting, because it reminds us that we are not our illness. Its ugliness is not our ugliness. We have free will, but our bodies have wills of their own, and though your body will decay, as long as you retain your will, you will retain your humanity, your soul, that part of you that might still be loved.

But to think that even that can be infected, and changed, and taken away— that’s the thought that keeps me up at night.

Source: » That Thing: A True Story Based on The Exorcist

 

October 16, 2015
by sarcozona
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What’ll you live on? You can’t work in a factory now.”

“They’ve promised me a disability rating. I don’t know if it’ll be Group 2 or Group 3.

“Which one is Group 3, then?” asked Kostoglotov. He didn’t understand these disability groups, or any other civil regulations for that matter.

“It’s one of these groups – enough to buy you bread, but not enough for sugar.”

from Alexander Solzenitsyn’s Cancer Ward